停停走走

mr postman街角的祝福

libraryNever noticed this Buddhist library before even though I’ve been to Melaka countless times. It’s along Jonker Street! A great respite from the heat and homo sapiens.

humansOur guesthouse is great for taking 凝视远方-ish 艺术照

In fact, Melaka is bursting with brilliant photo opportunities and it’s apparent from all the photographers – from the pros, to semipros, rowdy China tourists with DSLRs, and aunties with their compacts – that throng the place.

fishI love its white socks paws. And note the fish that Niki has very kindly drawn for Mr Meow so he can dream of them in his sleep.

I didnt know there are so many parallels between me and cats.. we’re all lazy, aloof, 想怎样就怎样, sleep-lovers and a little 闷骚.

I like how they always do things that amuse and amaze me; like snuggling into my bag to catch a catnap (he did it in such a  不慌不忙 and 名正言顺 manner that tickled me to death) and moving to my bed once I leave the room.

hotwheelsUsing cars for as long as they last – that’s environment-friendliness.

And don’t these vintage babies look good!

street没看到半辆Vespa

stare

Just Stare

no20aMr Meow, Mr Meow…  Hope you’re eating and sleeping well..

no20Love this place – clean, comfy, and artistically-furnished with one resident cat!

But if you can’t stand noise, don’t stay here. You get Chinese pop, trashy English hiphop and Malay ballads nonstop from 10am to 1am, thanks to the clothing store and Malay bistro below.

street1

Niki is going to buy the Panasonic LX3 and I’m sooo jealous!

猫的生活

meow

爱不理人就不理人 多快活

mail旧人旧物 永远最有味道

hello喂喂 欠我的钱几时还啊?

equanimity与世无争

cart等待

window

迎接阳光

view frm hostel

旅舍对面的风景

sky把窗打开 跟我挥挥手吧

shelf闹市中的一处幽静

shoes“你看,她在拍你的鞋子咧!”

我大笑了一声便开溜。

Been to heaven and back

慵懒 玩猫 漫无目的

丢掉手表 丢掉手机 摔烂电脑

酷热的天 冰凉的酸梅水

热闹的街 黄梨酥飘香

吃饱睡 睡饱吃

按摩 刮痧 被伺候

坐在床上帮猫盖被

走在街上都是气味

手指在快门上 颜色很到位

原来天堂是这般滋味

别把我摇醒 我还要睡

I swear I’ll twist the neck off anyone who attempts to hijack my weekend escapade to ___. Location is secret for obvious reasons. I have this ominous feeling that I’ve double-booked myself (again). But I’ll just pretend I didn’t realise.
I am going to spend a hundred bucks online; stop me!

Just live

I was scuttling through the MRT gantry that day when a random memory of myself being rabidly angry at someone hit me.

I remember I was ranting at the top of my voice to Dom, who was on the other end of the phone.  In full audible range of every passenger in that train compartment. I wasn’t angry at him; just at someone whom we were both angry with. (I think) I’ve never behaved like that in the presence of total strangers before, but I couldn’t care less.

After the memory struck, I tried really hard to recollect who that person was and what made me seethe, but I couldn’t remember a thing.

(Does it happen to everyone or am I just an outstanding scatterbrain?)

I’m amazed at how fleeting and forgettable little shitty stuff in life are. Shit happens. All the time. But do they really matter? All these seemingly catastrophic events and people that come in (and out!) of our lives. How major are they when viewed in the continuum of life?

We suffer so much less when we let go.

Respect must be earned.

Thio Su Mien: “Some of us live till 73 to celebrate feminism. We don’t go around shouting and shrieking. I believe I am a ‘feminist mentor’…QUIET please, because you have put me in your book. All of you have been asked to read about women who are first in their fields and I was so charmed to discover that I was in book on page 73. I was the first batch of law graduates and…SHOW SOME RESPECT TO YOUR ELDERS….”

[Somebody from the crowd shouted “You have to earn the RESPECT!”]

Lois Ng: “Ladies and gentlemen, please sit down, I have already mentioned to you about the house rules. We do not interrupt when somebody is speaking. There are many people here who wanted to speak.”

[The noise from the crowd continues to drown Thio Su Mien’s speech]

Thio Su Mien: “I was very charmed when I discovered I was in this book. Please show humility. I acted a point that I stand to stay something because it’s my desire, because you are women who are descendents of the pioneers of Singapore….I am disturbed, I was the first Law Dean, I was also the first to establish……YOU HAVE NO RESPECT FOR YOUR ELDERS”

[A lady pointed at her watch and shouted to Thio: “Your 3 minutes is UP!!”]

From Wayang Party

She’s a disgrace to all mankind.

Finally Aware

I was at the Aware EGM today. Honestly, I only started to read up on the controversy surrounding the women’s rights group about a week ago, and joined as a member on Friday. I really wanted to hear what both sides had to say and I figured this would be a once-in-a-lifetime experience.

To me, the EGM revealed the most beautiful and the ugliest sides of human nature. I saw how the old guard fought so courageously, with so much dignity and grace – not for power, money or fame – but for the good work of Aware to continue benefiting disadvantaged women, regardless of race, religion, and sexual orientation. They had goodness and truth in them, so they had nothing to fear and nothing to hide. The fact that many of them could stay calm and composed; making strong, sensible arguments despite all the false accusations and disrespectful language (“Shut up and sit down!” – I’m sure God would have approved of that) directed at them, was very admirable.

I also saw how the new guards were consumed with fear, anger and delusion as many members of the audience demanded truthful explanations for the uncountable misdeeds they have committed – which they couldn’t give, unsurprisingly. They were often rendered speechless when faced with questions from supporters of the old guard, and many of us shouted “Answer, answer!”. Hey, I’m quite proud of how civilised everyone was, minus the ones on stage – there were no physical fights, no namecalling, no personal attacks, despite all the injustice the old guard had to suffer.

Guilty of having told lie after lie, all they could do was to a) direct questions to the male legal counsel whom they hired with our money b) distract the audience from the crux of the issue by highlighting trivial, irrelevant details like “we slept at 4am everyday” (when what we really wanted to know was why they neglected to seek approval from other members for spending more than $20,000!) c) tell more lies.

There were just too many inconvenient truths that they didn’t have the moral courage to admit. Worse, they were unrepentant and frightfully arrogant.

This is not just about seeing homosexuals as human beings deserving of the right to love, be loved and pursue freedom like everyone else, it’s not just about religious bigotry: even if they were perfectly secular and accepting of homosexuals, I would vote them out of office – simply because the methods they employed to take over Aware have been deeply insidious and disturbingly underhanded. It’s a case study of McCarthyism in the Singapore context: they made use of loopholes in a weak Constitution, stripped longtime members of their roles, discrediting and misrepresenting them. These corporate highfliers – they took care to emphasize their educational and career achievements on one PowerPoint slide each – were visibly obsessed with what would probably make them high achievers in the corporate world: unscrupulousness, deception, and sheer dishonesty. Their orchestrated takeover of Aware has undeniably given Christians a bad name and has fanned feelings of distrust and suspicion towards members of this faith. This is especially so amongst people who aren’t well-informed of the different denominations within the Christian faith.

It just takes one group of deluded fundamentalists to ruin the decades of  interfaith work done by all religious groups since the racial riots. But I’m glad to see many real Christians (ie. those who adhere to the true teachings in the Bible) stand up and denounce this group.

It was interesting to see how passionate supporters of the old guard formed a long line to make their case – some waited 1.5 hours before they could speak – while supporters of the new guard (they sat in front of me) just sat passively in their seats – clapping occasionally when Josie says things like “Why can’t we do this like civilised people?”.

I wonder what went on in their minds. “Why am I here ah? Leg so tired from all that ushering and pretending to be friendly. Josie is marketing VP but dunno why can’t answer their questions hor. God bless her. Those old guard so rowdy, clap so loudly and scream somemore… very unwomanly leh. Call Josie liar somemore! (That’s me.) Shoot so many tough questions at them!  But God will bless them. Actually… I think I’m here cos my cell group leader told me to come? Aiya got free bus mah.” Something along these lines?

Anyway, I feel touched and charged with hope to see so many intelligent, talented, compassionate women and men stand up for justice to be served. It probably jerked many of us out of our apathy, although many people around me remain unconcerned about this issue.

I am reminded by this saga that evil will never triumph the good, and that most people in Singapore are still able to tell right from wrong. That’s better news than the very ungraceful (yet extremely gratifying) exit by those corporate witches.